8 ATTRIBUTES OF A MIDLIFE MILLENNIAL (PART 2)

Midlifers are becoming the new Millennials - here's 8 attributes we have in common with them

LATE IN LIFE MILLENNIALS

Last week I started a post on why Midlifers are late in life Millennials. We have so much in common with the traits of the Millennial generation - and often we manifest them from a deeper life experience. These attributes aren't something we've been handed on a plate, they've been hard won through living life in all its highs and lows.

In Part 1 (you can read it HERE) I covered the areas of technology, civic mindedness, authenticity, and being frugal. Every Midlifer has gained these attributes through several decades in the school of life. We've done the hard yards and gained the merit badges to show for it. Today I want to cover the other four attributes of a Midlife Millennial (MM).

5. GLOBAL CITIZENS WHO ARE NOMADIC AND ADVENTUROUS

Oh yes! You only have to dip your toes into the online blogs of Midlifers to find out how many are out there living the nomadic life or travelling all over the world. Once retirement kicks in and time constraints aren't as demanding, MM's are packing their bags and heading out to see the world.

You only have to dip your toes into the online blogs of Midlifers to find out how many are out there living the nomadic life or travelling all over the world

If you want to meet some of them, pop across to our #MLSTL link party and see some of the posts that are shared, there's an Aussie living in Russia, an American living in Tbilisi, a UK blogger in a canal boat, Global house sitters, regular travellers, and so many more. I love reading about their adventures and I plan to join in the fun once retirement is a reality for my husband and myself.

6. CONFIDENT AND ENTREPRENEURIAL

I'm not sure about every single Midlifer, but all the ones I know comment on how much more confident they are now than they were when they were younger. We all seem to have settled into ourselves and the opinions of other people don't seem to impact on us like they used to. I know I was so susceptible to any type of perceived criticism for almost my entire life, turning 50 was the beginning of letting that go.

Along with that new level of confidence, many MM's have launched into their own businesses or hobbies and are flourishing.

Along with that new level of confidence, many MM's have launched into their own businesses or hobbies and are flourishing. I discover new Midlife bloggers every week - people who are opening up and sharing their lives, who have really interesting things going on and they write about it regularly. Others have quit their jobs but aren't ready for retirement, so they're turning hobbies into businesses and setting themselves up online - through Facebook or Etsy or their blogs - it's just wonderful to see.

7.DIVERSE AND FLEXIBLE

Living life over several decades, two milleniums and countless life changes means that your average Midlifer has learned the fine art of going with the flow and rolling with the punches. It takes a lot to rattle a MM's cage - we've seen it all to some degree and have lived through it, coped with it, and come out stronger as a result. We've all found that you can't expect life to work on a lineal basis - A + B very rarely ends up being a neat and tidy result of C. There are a multitude of twists and turns and we've ridden the rollercoaster.

We've all found that you can't expect life to work on a lineal basis - A + B very rarely ends up being a neat and tidy result of C. There are a multitude of twists and turns and we've ridden the rollercoaster.

The biggest outcome of 50+ years of life is that you learn some wisdom and how to weather the storm. Most of us have worked in several jobs, we've learned new skills, conquered new technology, raised wonderful human beings, lost friends and loved ones, enjoyed relationships that have lasted for decades, and we keep learning and growing. I love what Midlife has brought with it - the ability to see more than one side of an argument, the knowledge that there are shades of grey, the insight that experience brings with it and how to apply that to whatever life deals out to us.

8. PRAGMATIC IDEALISTS WHO ARE PRACTICAL AND RESULTS ORIENTED

The lucky last category sums up MM's beautifully doesn't it? We aren't airy fairy in our approach to life, we didn't come down in the last shower - we're not newly hatched from the egg. We're becoming old souls who know what works and what doesn't. We've done the trial and error approach, we've figured out what's important and how to achieve it in a way that suits us and fits with our life views.

I think we all know that life is short and we don't have time to be messing around with stuff that doesn't have a purpose to it. It doesn't matter if it's work or play, we do what we feel is important and we focus our energy on the parts of life that have value - those values might be different for all of us, but we know who we are and where we're going. I love that this stage of life is so centred and we're not swayed by all the fluff and bubble that surrounds us.

WHAT ABOUT YOU?

Can you relate to these 8 attributes of Midlife Millennials? Can you see yourself in some of them? They all ring true for me - I love that we can give the young Millennials a run for their money and that we do it with substance and style!


Midlifers are becoming the new Millennials - here's 8 attributes we have in common with them

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Midlifers are becoming the new Millennials - here's 8 attributes we have in common with them

Midlife Musings on Cresting the Hill - a blog for Midlife Women

48 comments

  1. I love points 7 & 8 and definitely agree with them!

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    1. It's what life experience does for us isn't it Amy? We learn and grow and flex and adapt.

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  2. Just as with part 1 - yes, yes, yes and yes. I think more midlifers aren't choosing retirement so much as different careers - often making the most of their life passions.

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    1. I think we learn that we can incorporate lots of different facets into our lives Jo - it's not all about the almighty dollar any more - it's about what makes our hearts happy - and if there's a dollar in it that's an added bonus.

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  3. Hi, Leanne - I echo Jo in saying "yes, yes, yes and yes"! The attributes that you have listed here strongly resonate with me. Thank you for sharing them with us.

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    1. Me too Donna - they really reflect a life well lived. I don't think the Millennials have as deep an understanding of it all as we Midlifers do - we've lived and learned!

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  4. Another great post in this series Leanne. I do question how flexible some older Australians are - I do see quite a bit of judgemental and entrenched thinking, but then again I see that in some younger folk as well, but I do think that can become a weakness in some as we age.

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    1. You're right Jan - but I see it more as a Seniors problem rather than a Midlife problem - I think Midlifers are more in touch with what's going on because we have Millennial kids and also we're still connecting with the world and not tucked away securely in a safe retirement village :)

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  5. HI Leanne, spot on with Parts 1 & 2. Midlifers and beyond aren't retiring to sit and wait to die, we are getting on with living and enjoying the flexibility this phase of life brings. I think the wonderful part is that we learn that we should do what is right for us and not worry about what other people think. Excellent post, BBB! xx

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    1. Thanks so much Sue - and yes, it's about not sitting around and stagnating. I think we're well aware of the danger of becoming inflexible and set in our ways - and boring! I love that so many of us are still trying new things and growing and thriving - we're doing the whole Millennial thing better than the 30 year olds!

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    2. We sure are! Look at us blogging and hosting all of these fabulous women Over 50 at #MLSTL. I'm always inspired when I read their thoughts. Have a great week, it has certainly been a big one for you and thanks for co-hosting #MLSTL. I'm sharing on social media.

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  6. You've absolutely nailed this Leanne! We are definitely all of these things but my favourite is #8. We are unstoppable :)

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    1. Is it because we've finally figured out what's important Deb? For me, it's like my focus is narrowing down in some areas and widening out in others - I love how all of life's experiences are finally coming together and making sense.

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    2. I think you're right Leanne, we've finally figured out what's important to us and feel we can go for it! Sharing for #mlstl

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  7. What you've described in these last four attributes is someone who is open to change and taking the leaps to create that change in their lives. When I put aside caring and comparing myself to others, and following my own hopes and dreams, good things have happened in my later years. Lessons learned and making the most of the years left. Thanks Leanne!

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    1. Hi Mary Lou - yes, you're absolutely right - releasing all our comparisons and expectations is definitely the catalyst to finding out what inspires us and grees us to have a go at things we might not have attempted 20 years ago!

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  8. Hi Leanne, Great post! You really hit the nail on the head with these 4, spot on! It's nice being older and wiser, isn't it? I wonder how we will change in the next 20-30 years. :-) Hope we're still around then to discuss it. xx ps. thanks for the mention and link x

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    1. Hi Cheryl - I love that we're still relevant and still keeping up with all the new stuff that comes along. I think we'll know we're truly "old" when we just sit back and let the world move on without us. Until then we'll be giving it our best shot won't we?

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  9. Hi, Leanne - Thank you for all of the work that you and Sue do in hosting this Midlife Link Up. You have built up a wonderful community here.
    Shared on my SM. #MLSTL

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    1. Hi Donna - it's a great group of bloggers isn't it? I love the variety and the thoughtful posts that are so easy to comment on and share. Thanks for being such an intergral part of it x

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  10. Yes to all four attributes, Leanne. Like you wrote, we know life is short and we've become more focused and intentional with how we live. Thank you for the mention and link. #MLSTL

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    1. Hi Natalie - I look at how we're all doing it differently, but doing it so well. We're not letting life pass us by, but each grabbing the bits that we love and doing more with it. Still so much growing and developing to go ;)

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  11. I'm really enjoying this series! I've definitely become more confident, intentional and focused with age! Learning to smile at the future.

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    1. Me too Marya - it's so much better than I expected it to be. I always saw middle age as a grey and invisible stage - until I got here and found so many fabulous women who are changing the face of 50+

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  12. I like that you see us as similar. I have to say, I like the enthusiasm of Milenials. I am finding my generation becoming a lot less fun...#MidlifeSharethelove

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    1. I think every stage of life is a choice Lydia - we can choose to engage or disengage with life. I've probably mellowed a fair bit, but I'm also super enthusiastic about what does interest me and I'm more whole hearted in what I commit to these days.

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  13. Leanne, I love this series. I am so tired of everyone bashing millennials. The ones I have worked with have been hardworking and kind and global minded and civic oriented and everything you have mentioned. I never thought to compare us to millennials in this way but it makes a lot of sense!

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    1. I think every generation has people in it who do life well and those who choose to do it selfishly. When you drill down to the best qualities and look for those who are doing their best to manifest them, you can see swathes of people living their best lives and inspiring others - age is irrelevant - it's attitude that makes all the difference.

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  14. Another brilliant post Leanne! I agree with all you've said. I think I'm one of those who walked away from the corporate life but not ready to retire just yet. I'm not much of an entrepreneur though but I've been dabbling in this n that! I hope to join some of those travellers and see more of the world one day. I'm a real homebody so I won't ever be constantly travelling but one big exciting trip per year + some weekend getaways would suit me just fine! xo

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    1. I'm much the same Min - I want to still be engaged and relevant, I want to see bits of the world (but not all of it and not all of the time!) I love my home life and I love my blogging because I can do it from home - it's such a fantastic stage of life if you allow yourself to look at the positives and to keep seizing new opportunities.

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  15. You make me so proud to be a mid-lifer! I too, let go of the criticism at age fifty, and I've gradually become a much more confident person. I really enjoyed this two part post. Thank-you for sharing a link to my blog. See you in mid March, when I'll link up again from Riga, Latvia.

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    1. Hi Christina - I'm so glad that you loved the 2 part series. I couldn't believe how much we had in common with Millennials when I started looking into it. We aren't fading into the woodwork in our 50's, we're growing, learning, travelling, and living life to the full - I bet those Millennials actually envy us.

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  16. I'm loving this series. I think we forget as midlife millennials how lucky we are and what we've become. We are so lucky to live in the age we do, with the privilege of a war-free and depression-free existence. Nomadic travellers many of us have become, who seize the moment because we can, who are adventurous rather than luxury travel seekers striving to understand the world and its many cultures. This has made us more diverse and flexible, confident and entrepreneurial, because we have had the fortunate culture bestowed upon us that anything is possible. A tenet that perhaps our parents generation really didn't have :) Shared on SM :)

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    1. You're so right Jo - this is definitely a great time to be alive. I think the internet has opened so many new worlds and ideas up for us. We see others living really interesting lives and realize that we can have a part of that too. We don't have to sit in a rocking chair and watch life being lived by the youngsters, we're too busy getting out there and enjoying what life still has to offer us.

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  17. Yes to all four of these points! I can honestly say there is no stage of life that I would rather be in right now--for many of the reasons you have pointed out in this post and part 1. Thank you for putting it into words that help me appreciate what I have achieved and become just by living these 50+ years. #MLSTL

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    1. I feel the same way Christie, I don't think I realized in any of my previous decades that life was as good as it is now. I was so "others focused" that I didn't get to ask myself what I wanted to do or what I liked. Now I have more time and space, I'm filling it with little things that are "me" and I'm really loving that more than I can say.

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  18. I can relate to all of these points. If husbands hadn't gotten sick we would rarely be home because we planned a lot of travel. We realize who we are at this age and are fairly fearless.

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    1. You're right Victoria - we are more fearless than we were when we were younger. I felt like I had to be the safety net for my family and I worried about a lot more stuff than I need to worry about now. Once your husband gets well again, some of that carefree travel will reappear in your life xx

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  19. Pragmatic Idealist - that's me. Part of my 'branding' is 'practical visionary.' Another great post!

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    1. I definitely think we're realists Janet - but that doesn't stop us from being dreamers sometimes and for wanting as much out of life as we can practically handle. Life experience + hope and a little ambition works amazingly in Midlife doesn't it?

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  20. Very interesting how you have applied your knowledge and observations Leanne.

    Thanks for sharing.

    Denyse #mlstl

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    1. Thanks Denyse - I'm glad you found it interesting and hope you were encouraged by it x

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  21. I LOVE this connection! Maybe we'll be really understanding parents of adult children because of this!

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  22. Yes we are doing it with 'substance and style.' As much as I admire this generation, I do worry that they have it backwards. Call me old fashioned, but I like that raising a family and building a career came first. Sure, we made sacrifices to save money, but we still had family vacations and rich experiences while raising our daughter. Now, the second half is just us, to do as we please, whenever we please. What will their second half look like? Thoughtful post. Thanks for sharing.

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  23. Terrific post - I always say: "you can't stop the aging process but you don't have to get old!"

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  24. Yes! Great post! I especially liked this:
    "Living life over several decades, two milleniums and countless life changes means that your average Midlifer has learned the fine art of going with the flow and rolling with the punches."
    Excellent post.

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  25. This post made me smile, Leanne! All these positive qualities make me proud to be a midlifer - and gives me hope for a meaningful, productive future :)

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  26. I've always been conscious how different I have been to my parents and grandparents - in terms of attitude and behaviour etc... I wonder if the tide will turn and future generations will be more conservative or something?!

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