WHAT IS NEUROGRAPHIC ART? IT'S A GREAT CHOICE FOR THE NON ARTIST

Neurographical art is perfect  for a non artist. It creates mindfulness and peace without having too much structure or the ability to draw skilfully.
Created from original image by Bagdadi

WHAT IS NEUROGRAPHIC ART?

I've always been convinced that I have no artistic ability whatsoever, but now that I have more time, I'm on a journey to discover whether there may be kernels of creativity hiding inside me that are just waiting for the opportunity emerge. If you follow my Cresting the Hill Facebook page, I've been sharing what I've been doing since I stumbled across Neurographic art recently. It caught my eye and my imagination because it's an art form that just flows, and it reminded me of images of brain neurones combined with pretty colours. I was itching to explore more about it....

Brain neurones

It turns out that (according to the Neurographica Academy

Neurographica® was developed by the Russian philosopher, psychologist, architect, and professor Pavel Piskarev in 2014, and it's is built on solid scientific principles, combining visual thinking with the laws and patterns identified by various schools of psychology. Namely: neuropsychology, analytical psychology, Gestalt psychology, Psychosynthesis, social psychology and modern management theory.

So it has all sorts of deeper meaning and can be used for more than just creating pretty pictures, but I figured that I'd start simple and see where it took me.

HOW HARD IS IT TO DO NEUROGRAPHIC ART?

Neurographic art can be as simple or as complex as you'd like to make it. It's often abstract, but it can also incorporate realistic images if you want to change it up a little. The biggest takeaway for me is that it requires absolutely no artistic skill to create a beautiful image. Once you follow a few guidelines that they refer to as "algorithms" (see the end of my post), you just launch into it and enjoy the process.

A great Youtube video I came across gives you the basics and from there you can watch more, or just grab a black sharpie pen and a kid's pack of watercolour paints - and go for it. 

(one of the images in the video link above is by Yulia Kremen)

DO YOU HAVE TO BE ARTISTIC TO ATTEMPT NEUROGRAPHICA?

I can attest that you need absolutely no artistic skill at all to produce artwork that looks good and gives you a sense of "wow I made that!" You can use watercolour paper if you have it, or just normal paper if you haven't. I bought a $2 black sharpie pen and already had a $3 set of watercolour paints and that was all I needed for my first attempt.

My first attempt at neurographical drawing
Attempt Number 1
I then tried my hand at drawing over existing images. The image I've used for my header picture was one I'd found online from Pinterest that was created HERE. She seemed perfect for an attempt at something different. I tried a few more and then decided to combine them in a collage - something else I've been having a lot of fun with in my spare time.

Combining neurographical art with collage

CAN NEUROGRAPHIC ART SOOTHE YOUR SOUL?

I found the whole process to be very medatitive, but I've also read that it's a great tool for dealing with problem solving and stress. The suggestion is that you write your problem, goal, topic, or theme (something you are trying to find peace with in your life) on the back of the page you're going to draw on, and then create your neurographical artwork - then go back afterwards to reconsider the problem and see if you have new insights.

The idea is to mindfully immerse yourself in the drawing - (using the algorithm below) and the process will transform the fear and chaos of the world into something more calming and peaceful - taking away the stress. I had a lovely lady share with me on Facebook that she found exactly that when she tried her hand at creating a drawing. It was a simple, mindful way to disengage from all that was going on in her head and just be in the moment - and she found that really helpful and relaxing.

THE NEUROGRAPHICAL ALGORITHM

This is basically how you do a neurographical drawing step by step:

  • Use a felt tip pen to draw a long looping or criss-crossing/scribble-like line on your paper.
  • If you want to do it “the art therapy way,” think of a problem or issue you are facing while you draw the line.
  • Don’t try to draw something, just let it be a line.
  • Find any sharp corners where lines cross or turn and round those, filling in the gap with ink.
  • Add “field lines” that extend to the edges, then round any new corners.
  • You can also add shapes that overlap the lines if you want.
  • Add color (you can blend colors or do shading)
  • Draw smaller lines that overlap and round corners again.
  • You can turn some of the lines into something recognizable or keep it abstract.

neurographical art
This one started with a cursive "L"

WHY NOT HAVE A TRY?

If you're wondering whether you'd be any good at this - why not give it a try? I've been using mine for backgrounds for my collaging when I finish them - so a win/win for me!

Using neurographical art as a background in a collage

RELATED POSTS


Neurographical art is perfect  for a non artist. It creates mindfulness and peace without having too much structure or the ability to draw skilfully.

JUST A FINAL NOTE:

If you'd like to know when I write a new post, please click HERE for email updates.
If you'd like to comment but not here on the blog, feel free to email me at
 leanne.crestingthehill@gmail.com - I'd love to hear from you.
And please share this post by clicking on a share button before you go.
Cresting the Hill - a blog for Midlife (Middle Aged / 50+) women who want to thrive
Neurographical art is perfect  for a non artist. It creates mindfulness and peace without having too much structure or the ability to draw skilfully.

41 comments

  1. Oh, Leanne, I remember you mentioning that you didn't think you had a creative bone about you. And look...just look at the art you are creating!! I have never heard of this approach to drawing but I can see where it would be very soothing to allow the pen to meander about the page creating soft abstract shapes. When I doodle, I almost always create rounded shapes so this is right up my alley. And your colors are so serene. Love how you used your piece as a background for you collage. I am doing some collage work, too, through a gal named Jennifer Chamberlin. It is more concrete than abstract and has been very cathartic for me. Going to experiment with a little now. Hope you will continue to share your artistic talents with us.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Leslie - thank you so much for your kind words. I don't think I'll ever be "artistic" as such, but I'm allowing myself the grace to be a little creative whenever something looks like it's doable. Some things keep me engaged and others are for a season. I'm still loving my collaging and being able to use these in the process is kind of extra bang for my buck!

      Delete
  2. This is fascinating, I had not heard of this type of art before. Your results are quite pretty.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Terra - I love the simplicity and the softness of the watercolours as they contrast with the lines. It's been a little project that only takes snippets of time and has been really restful to do.

      Delete
  3. Hi, Leanne - You have a wonderful sense of colour, line, design and flow. I would definitely call you an artist. Your work is beautiful!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh Donna thank you for your kind words. I love the flow of this type of drawing - it also reminds me of bubbles when you get a clump of them together. I'm enjoying trying my hand at things that are fun with no right or wrong outcome.

      Delete
  4. So interesting Leanne! Is it like doodling then filling in the gaps a bit?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There's definitely a doodley quality to it Deb - and then going back over it to fill in the corners is a great way to see it all come together. I'm enjoying doing it over an existing picture - it changes things around and feels arty to me. :)

      Delete
  5. Looks like you've found a hidden talent Leanne. Recently I did some alcohol ink art which Rachel showed me how to do and you don't need any creativity for that! This seems very interesting although I'm not sure I have the patience at the moment. You've done a great job though. x #lifethisweek

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Sue - I thought your alcohol ink art was beautiful - the colours are amazing. There's so many art forms out there to try and it's fun when we discover something that we can do when we thought we had no ability in that area isn't it?

      Delete
  6. I Love this, thanks for telling us about it!!
    You ARE creative
    And thoughtful, and sensitive, and perceptive, and peaceful, and Encouraging...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh Victoria what lovely things to say - you've absolutely made my morning - thank you!! :) xx

      Delete
  7. This is fascinating! I've never heard of it before, and when I watched the video, it also made me think of neurons. Your creations are absolutely beautiful! And soothing to look at, somehow. Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Susanne - it's just a very pleasant way to spend an hour here or there - certainly a lot less work than learning the guitar! (Although I have a secret yearning to do that too!)

      Delete
  8. My dad was the artistic type (me not so much). He had me doing a simplified version of this when I was a child - without the therapy component. I loved it. Thank you for the reminder. It would be fun to do again.

    Michelle
    https://mybijoulifeonline.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Michelle - I think it's a lovely thing to add into mindfulness - not something I'd do every day, but a great little activity when I need to give my brain the chance to turn off for a while - and I love that it has a creative element (something my life has been sadly lacking in for many decades!)

      Delete
  9. My boys and I used to experiment with art just like this and I had no idea that we were doing neurographic art! I always found mixing paints and filling in white spaces soothing so when my youngest insisted he hated art I went on to find us more abstract art like this where were just let flow and explore with the mediums.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It would be a great way for a child who doesn't think they like art, to produce something that looks great and calms the soul in the process. I've never been "arty" but I like that I'm discovering different types of creativity that don't require me to be Michelangelo.

      Delete

  10. Hi Leanne, Your artistic, creative endeavours are exceptionally beautiful. Until this very moment, I did not know the meaning of this art form. I also say I have no artistic skills. In Pictionary, no one can tell the difference between my horse and my chicken.😊

    I reread your paragraph beginning with “I found the whole process to be very meditative….” a few times. Fascinating information.

    I am pondering the concepts of “artistic” and “creative.” - depending on interpretation - since I believe every person is creative.

    Ultimately your results are amazing. I can feel your joy and wonderful energy infused in the beautiful artwork. A great post, Leanne!xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Erica - lovely to hear from you and I hope that means that things are going well on the home front? Thank you for your thoughtful and encouraging comment (I've missed your upbeat-ness and generosity!) I'd like to think we're all "creative" too and that maybe we were all pigeonholed into a form of art in school that wasn't right for most of us and we missed the opportunity to find other creative forms to give the right side of our brains a bit of a challenge :) xx

      Delete
    2. Hi again, Leanne, Still increased challenges around here. I still visit and try to put 'good stuff' into the Universe - many blessings - love your updates, Leanne. xx

      Delete
    3. I'm sorry to hear that all's not perfect in your world yet, but I know you'll be handling it with positivity and gratitude for all the good stuff in between. Sending you love and a hug xx

      Delete
  11. Hi Leanne. I'm so intrigued by this type of art, and I'm going to give it a go. What fascinates me about it is, it's connection to psychology, which in addition to art, I've always been interested in. I'm also drawn to this type of art, because you mention that you don't have to be an artist. That removes the need, for me, to be perfect. It allows me the freedom, to just be creative, without the fear of being judged. Right now,we're snowed in, in Chiatura, and I'm making a life-size tree, from paper mache. When the weather gets better, I'll get to the local shop, for supplies, to try this neurographic art. In the meantime, I think I'll watch the YouTube video. Thank you so much for sharing this delightful post! Cheers, Christina Daggett

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Christina, I'm feeling drawn to art that has no "right or wrong" to it - that way I can try things without the fear of it failing or looking like rubbish. I know what my limits are and if I find little things like this then I'm keen to give it a go and see if I can get a little creativity into my life. I'd love to see anything you end up doing. I'm also really interested to see what your tree is going to look like - make sure you post a pic of it on FB! I also can't imagine being snowed in - we're in the middle of Summer here and the days are hot and dry - soooo different!

      Delete
  12. I love this Leanne. Thank you for sharing a little of the background and the process for this kind of art. I think it may be right up my alley. Like you, I've never considered myself as much of an artist, but I do want to create (if that makes sense) and I love all things tied to being more mindful and meditative in life. I'm going to give it a go.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I found it really pleasant to do Christie and I liked changing it around a bit by doing it over existing images. I'll never be able to draw faces that look "correct" but by using something as a background I get the best of both worlds. Plus my $3 kid's watercolour paint pallette has definitely given me my money's worth!

      Delete
  13. Leanne I'm really tempted to try and I never try anything like this. Of course I now need to go from 'wanting' to, to actually doing it but I'm keen to give it a go.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's fairly short and sweet to do an A5 pic Deb - and I'm sure you own a black sharpie - have a go and let me know what you think xx

      Delete
  14. I’d say you have more than one creative bones in you Leanne. It was interesting to read about this type of art as I’ve never heard of it. It must be fun for you to find your creative side. I’ve enjoyed seeing it develop

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Jen - I'm hoping there's a few creative bones in there - they may never be as strong as I'd like, but I'm happy just to develop them a little and enjoy flexing my new muscles - retirement has so many great sides to it.

      Delete
  15. DEAR Leanne, you are an artist, you are creative...so time to drop the negative and non words...
    This is such lovely lovely fun, both for you and those who view it. Limiting yourself with labels is no longer the thing to do. Enjoy it all....the peace, the movement, the mindfulness...and sigh, look at what you just did. Love it.

    It’s been great to see your post in the link up for Life This Week at Denyse Whelan Blogs.
    I look forward to seeing you again next Monday if you have a post to share. Thanks so much. Denyse.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Denyse - it's so hard to change a self-concept after 50+ years of being told by other people (and myself) that I'm not creative. It's been a kind of defence mechanism against stretching myself and possibly failing. To have found things that are arty and fun is a huge boost - and I intend to enjoy them and keep discovering new aspects of myself. Thank you so much for the encouragement (I need it!)

      Delete
  16. As you know, I think everyone is creative in their own way - the key is having the courage to get over what someone cruelly said in childhood (and I think everyone has a thoughtless, doubting adult in the background reminding them why they're still wasting time with that rubbish) and turning up. This is seriously cool and I love what you're doing with it. Off to google it some more.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Hi Leanne, This looks interesting and your finished artwork is beautiful. I like the colours used in the cursive L photo. Keep on having fun. Thank you for linking up with #weekendcoffeeshare.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Natalie - I'm loving playing around with the water colour pallette and feeling a bit "arty" in the process. It's all pretty basic, but a good start to freeing myself up a bit more creatively.

      Delete
  18. Interesting! I do this from time to time with the kids, without knowing that there was a name for it. Thank you for an interesting post!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Maria - yes it's been around for several years and I've seen art teachers on youtube doing it with students - and showing how to take it to more complex levels. It's been a fun exercise to stretch myself a little creatively.

      Delete
  19. Very beautiful. I can't draw a straight line. I might have to try this.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm a hopeless line drawer and I'm not good with 'real life' art Patrick, but I'm finding I can do things that need a sense of proportion and knowing when I've done 'enough' on the page - so I'm getting there slowly (just 50+ years behind where I could have been!)

      Delete
  20. This sounds awesome! I've seen neurographic art groups pop up in my suggested Facebook groups but had no idea what they were, assuming originally neurographic was some combination of neurodivergent (ie. autistic, ADHD, etc.) and graphic design. I am blind so I cannot really do this, although I have in the past tried meditative scribbling.

    ReplyDelete
  21. That is so pretty Leanne. I've always wanted to try my hand at zentangle. This looks fun too.

    ReplyDelete

Thanks so much for your comment - it's where the connection begins.
If you don't have a Google account please choose "Name/URL" from the drop down arrow and type in your first name (you don't need a URL) and hit "Continue" to leave your comment.