The A-Z Challenge ~ Why Midlife's Fabulous ~ Retirement? What Retirement?

The A-Z Challenge ~ Why Midlife's Fabulous ~ Retirement???

TO RETIRE OR NOT TO RETIRE? THAT IS THE QUESTION

There comes a time in every Midlifer's life when the question about when to retire raises its confusing (and yet strangely alluring) head. We see some of our work colleagues taking the plunge and leaving the 9 -5 daily grind behind and heading into a lovely sunset of late morning sleep-ins and a lifelong holiday. The temptation is to follow them out the door and into a twilight of endless leisure.

THE WORKING CLASS POOR

The trouble for Midlifers like me is that we're not independently wealthy and we don't have the financial reserves to quit work and start living a life of unending ease. We look at our savings and start calculating how long they'd last for, and the answer isn't very inspiring. We might be debt free, but we still need to eat and pay those pesky bills that roll in with relentless regularity. What happens when the savings are gone and there are still a couple of decades still left to live?

The idea of spending my twilight years living under a bridge in a sleeping bag and eating catfood is not hugely appealing. So, for this Midlifer retirement isn't an immediate option. It lies in the future tantalizingly beckoning me, but I am valiantly holding out. 

WHAT'S THE SOLUTION?

The secret to staying on the work treadmill is finding a job you like and one that fits in with the lifestyle you want to achieve. For me it meant leaving a mind numbing job and looking around for something new. It meant finding a job that was part-time so I could enjoy some of those retirement delights without losing my income in its entirety. I've settled for a job where I'm appreciated, where I feel like I'm making a difference, where I'm paid what I'm worth, and where I can give them value for the pay cheque they give me each fortnight.

I probably have another decade or so left in the workforce and I'd like it to be pleasant and not a grind that leaves me miserably looking forward to the weekend. What is your secret to staying out of the retirement zone?


too young to retire and too old for nonsense

If you'd like to read more about Working vs Retirement you can go HERE or HERE.
See you tomorrow for S which is for Self Confidence.

This post was shared at some of these great link parties
To keep up to date with my posts, feel free to add your email into the spot especially for it on my sidebar or follow me on facebook

13 comments

  1. My secret to avoid retirement is to get yourself a grandchild. Then you begin a new treadmill all over again - one that keeps you going for the next 18 years!

    ReplyDelete
  2. A new lease on life! Like you, I picked up a nice part-time job for awhile. Running out of money, especially here in the US, is a real concern yet I'm content to live within my means while still doing what I love and enjoy. A lot of free stuff going on here for seniors. Life is good! :)
    www.meinthemiddlewrites.com

    ReplyDelete
  3. In Switzerland we have a pretty great social security system that allows people who have been employed all through their adulthood to retire at age 65 and, in combination with their personal savings, lead a decent life. For single moms who stayed at home for let's say 15 -. 20 years, it's more challenging.
    That's one of the reasons I've always kept a part-time job so I won't have too huge a pension fun gap.
    What is interesting to see is that my parents are not less busy now that they are retired. But that's actually a good thing, being active keeps 'em young.
    Happy Friday! Is it still Friday at your end???

    ReplyDelete
  4. I didn't avoid it. I'm officially retired, and yes, it's a constant challenge to keep going thanks to the constantly escalating rate of exchange. But I write - and it's great to have my own timetable.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I don't like the idea of retirement. I would go out of my mind with nothing to do. So I'm thinking of finally making blogging a profession. I do it only as a pastime activity right now. But, it's becoming more and more appealing lately!
    Good to catch up with you again, Leanne.
    Do stop by sometime.
    Happy AtoZing!
    Chicky @ www.mysteriouskaddu.com

    ReplyDelete
  6. I'm not looking to retire and my ultimate goal would be to do something similar to what you did and move into part time work doing something about which I can be passionate. WeekendsInMaine

    ReplyDelete
  7. If I stay where I am at I can retire in 6 1/2 years and work part-time but I am trying to move on from where I am at, I have my 20 there so I can get medical for life at 55 and I am fully vested in retirement.

    Like you said I am done with the nonsense at my work. It is more about being done with the unethical behavior and lack of integrity that new administration has brought with them. All done dealing with that.

    Thank you very much for helping my resolve in leaving.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hubby retired two years ago at the age of 58, this year I will be 56, so I am planning the same exit strategy as well.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I contract so if a contract ends then it's nice to take a break for a couple of months and just chill. I've also decided that if there are no statutory holidays in the month, a day or two off would be a good thing. Eventually I'd like to work part time. But that's not for another decade at least.

    Suzy at Someday Somewhere - Respond Intelligently

    ReplyDelete
  10. My 'regular' job ended (no more funding) in 2009 and since then, I've said I'm semi-retired... easing into ti... well, I am busier now with projects and activities (of MY choice), doing some part-time work that appeals to me and is meaningful. Very pleased to have the choices now.

    Affirmations for a Good Life

    ReplyDelete
  11. I had the decision made for me. The company I worked for was bought out by a larger conglomerate and they changed everything to make it impossible for me to stay on. So I got my walking papers. Not nice when there are 3 years to worry about what you are going to do next....but I will survive and come out on the other end feeling better about what I do and how I do it.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Your second paragraph echoes our thoughts as well. This is why my husband is still working at 67. He'll get a bigger pension later on, plus he now has free supplementary health benefits (dental, vision, drugs). Those will be hard to give up! I'm self-employed and only have the piddly government pension coming up, so I plan on running my doggie hotel as long as possible. And besides, '60 is the new 40', or something to that effect. ☺

    ReplyDelete
  13. I love that you were able to take the leap and leave a job you disliked to find one that worked better for you. As for retiring - I'm Canadian, so I think it is different here. In any event, it is a long way away for me at this stage and not something I have thought about beyond setting up my retirement saving account and dutifully contributing. It sounds like you have a solid plan that will avoid a future including cat food for anyone other than your pets... - Louise

    ReplyDelete